Guy Fawkes

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(Taken July 4th, 2011)

Remember, remember the Fifth of November, the Gunpowder Treason and Plot, I see no reason why Gunpowder Treason should ever be forgot.

Guy Fawkes, t’was his intent to blow up King and Parliament.

Three score barrels were laid below to prove old England’s overthrow; By God’s mercy he was catch’d with a dark lantern and lighted match.

Holloa boys, holloa boys, let the bells ring.

Holloa boys, holloa boys, God save the King!

Hip hip hoorah!

A penny loaf to feed the Pope
A farthing o’ cheese to choke him.

A pint of beer to rinse it down.
A faggot of sticks to burn him.

Burn him in a tub of tar.
Burn him like a blazing star.

Burn his body from his head.
Then we’ll say ol’ Pope is dead.

Hip hip hoorah!
Hip hip hoorah hoorah!

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Guy Fawkes, also known as Guido Fawkes, the name he adopted while fighting for the Spanish in the Low Countries, was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England’s Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James’s nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed. His fellow plotters were John Wright, Thomas Wintour, Thomas Percy, Guy Fawkes, Robert Keyes, Thomas Bates, Robert Wintour, Christopher Wright, John Grant, Sir Ambrose Rookwood, Sir Everard Digby and Francis Tresham. Fawkes, who had 10 years of military experience fighting in the Spanish Netherlands in suppression of the Dutch Revolt, was given charge of the explosives.

The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter sent to William Parker, 4th Baron Monteagle, on 26 October 1605. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder—enough to reduce the House of Lords to rubble—and arrested. Most of the conspirators fled from London as they learnt of the plot’s discovery, trying to enlist support along the way. Several made a stand against the pursuing Sheriff of Worcester and his men at Holbeche House; in the ensuing battle Catesby was one of those shot and killed. At their trial on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

Details of the assassination attempt were allegedly known by the principal Jesuit of England, Father Henry Garnet. Although Garnet was convicted and sentenced to death, doubt has been cast on how much he really knew of the plot. As its existence was revealed to him through confession, Garnet was prevented from informing the authorities by the absolute confidentiality of the confessional. Although anti-Catholic legislation was introduced soon after the plot’s discovery, many important and loyal Catholics retained high office during King James I’s reign. The thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot was commemorated for many years afterwards by special sermons and other public events such as the ringing of church bells, which have evolved into the Bonfire Night of today.

Information: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpowder_Plot

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On 5 November 1605, Londoners were encouraged to celebrate the King’s escape from assassination by lighting bonfires, “always provided that ‘this testemonye of joy be carefull done without any danger or disorder.'”

An Act of Parliament designated each 5 November as a day of thanksgiving for “the joyful day of deliverance,” and remained in force until 1859. Although he was only one of 13 conspirators, Fawkes is today the individual most associated with the failed Plot.

In Britain, 5 November has variously been called Guy Fawkes Night, Guy Fawkes Day, Plot Night and Bonfire Night; the latter can be traced directly back to the original celebration of 5 November 1605. Bonfires were accompanied by fireworks from the 1650s onwards, and it became the custom to burn an effigy (usually the pope) after 1673, when the heir presumptive, James, Duke of York, made his conversion to Catholicism public. Effigies of other notable figures who have become targets for the public’s ire, such as Paul Kruger and Margaret Thatcher, have also found their way onto the bonfires, although most modern effigies are of Fawkes.

The “guy” is normally created by children, from old clothes, newspapers, and a mask. During the 19th century, “guy” came to mean an oddly dressed person, but in American English it lost any pejorative connotation, and was used to refer to any male person.

William Harrison Ainsworth’s 1841 historical romance Guy Fawkes; or, The Gunpowder Treason portrays Fawkes in a generally sympathetic light, and transformed him in the public perception into an “acceptable fictional character.”

Fawkes subsequently appeared as “essentially an action hero” in children’s books and penny dreadfuls such as The Boyhood Days of Guy Fawkes; or, The Conspirators of Old London, published in about 1905. Fawkes’ reputation has, over the course of the years, undergone a rehabilitation and he is sometimes toasted as “the last man to enter Parliament with honest intentions.”

Information from: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Fawkes#section_3

I hope you enjoyed this post! Have a great day!

Let’s hear your thoughts on this article. Was Guy Fawkes a terrorist or an idealist?

Save the Bradford Odeon

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“Great architecture has only two natural enemies: water and stupid men.” ~ Richard Nickel

I have recently learned that a architectural beauty is very close to being torn down. The Bradford Odeon was a cine theater company’s Odeon Cinemas in the city of Bradford. The building opened in 1938, bombed in 1940, rebuilt in 2000 and closed. Its landmark facade has been left virtually untouched.

History of the Bradford Odeon: http://www.kingsdr.demon.co.uk/cinemas/odeon.htm

20120903-141959.jpg(The Odeon is currently covered awaiting its fate).

The Homes and Communities Agency owns the building and plans to raze it. It says restoring the cinema would be too expensive. Mr. Mark Nicholson, from the Bradford Odeon Rescue Group, said talks with the agency would continue and he hoped the new plans would save the building.

“Although the building itself at the moment looks like an eyesore and is covered up there’s still massive potential there for it to be redeveloped. The architecture is fantastic, you have got the iconic towers. It’s more than possible to work with what you have got there and turn it into a real asset for the 21st Century in Bradford.” ~ Mr. Nicholson

Here is a great article to help you understand the plight of the Bradford Odeon: Bradford Odeon: Can we have our happy ending now please?

The moment that we forget our past, is the moment we forget ourselves. Don’t let this fine building be torn down. Please spent a few minutes to sign this online petition to Save the Bradford Odeon http://t.co/4AZGJCmn

Thank you for your time!

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Friday the 13th History

Hi!

Wikipedia is a great source of information. I know it’s not always accurate; however, this is some great information on the history of Friday the 13th.

According to folklorists, there is no written evidence for a “Friday the 13th” superstition before the 19th century. The earliest known documented reference in English occurs in Henry Sutherland Edwards’ 1869 biography of Gioachino Rossini, who died on a Friday 13th.

He [Rossini] was surrounded to the last by admiring friends; and if it be true that, like so many Italians, he regarded Fridays as an unlucky day and thirteen as an unlucky number, it is remarkable that one Friday 13th of November he died.

Several theories have been proposed about the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition.

One theory states that it is a modern amalgamation of two older superstitions: that thirteen is an unlucky number and that Friday is an unlucky day.

In numerology, the number twelve is considered the number of completeness, as reflected in the twelve months of the year, twelve hours of the clock, twelve gods of Olympus, twelve tribes of Israel, twelve Apostles of Jesus, the 12 successors of Muhammad in Shia Islam, twelve signs of the Zodiac, etc., whereas the number thirteen was considered irregular, transgressing this completeness. There is also a superstition, thought by some to derive from the Last Supper or a Norse myth, that having thirteen people seated at a table will result in the death of one of the diners.

Friday has been considered an unlucky day at least since the 14th century’s The Canterbury Tales, and many other professions have regarded Friday as an unlucky day to undertake journeys or begin new projects.

One author, noting that references are all but nonexistent before 1907 but frequently seen thereafter, has argued that its popularity derives from the publication that year of Thomas W. Lawson’s popular novel Friday, the Thirteenth, in which an unscrupulous broker takes advantage of the superstition to create a Wall Street panic on a Friday the 13th.

Records of the superstition are rarely found before the 20th century, when it became extremely common. The connection between the Friday the 13th superstition and the Knights Templar was popularized in Dan Brown’s 2003 novel The Da Vinci Code and in John J. Robinson’s 1989 work Born in Blood: The Lost Secrets of Freemasonry. On Friday, 13 October 1307, hundreds of the Knights Templar were arrested in France, an action apparently motivated financially and undertaken by the efficient royal bureaucracy to increase the prestige of the crown. Philip IV was the force behind this ruthless move, but it has also tarnished the historical reputation of Clement V. From the very day of Clement V’s coronation, the king falsely charged the Templars with heresy, immorality and abuses, and the scruples of the Pope were compromised by a growing sense that the burgeoning French State might not wait for the Church, but would proceed independently. However, experts agree that this is a relatively recent correlation, and most likely a modern-day invention.

Link: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_the_13th#section_1

For The Future

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Hi Everyone!

I thought I’d change things up with the photos so you don’t have to see snow everyday. I took this photo awhile back in Washington DC. I was with some friends, giving them a tour since I’ve lived in this area for more than half my life, and of course it was raining. I always end up on tours when it rains.

This particular photo was taken at the Vietnam Memorial Wall where there are a total of 58,267 names of men and women who were killed or remain missing in action written on the gabbro walls. In case you don’t know, gabbro refers to a large group of dark, coarse-grained, intrusive mafic igneous rocks chemically equivalent to basal.

Well, the rain was coming down pretty hard and I was ready to leave when this child pulls away from his mother to check out the wall for himself. He carefully walked up to the wall and stared at it for a moment. The way he reflected on the wall was haunting. I was able to snap a quick shot before his mother called him back to the group. I remember hearing him ask his mother “Are they all dead?” The mother just nodded and they walked away.

This scene has always stuck with me because I am a military brat. Both my parents served in the Air Force and my grandfathers were also in the military and so forth. You could say that the military runs through my veins. People sometimes just go to this memorials to see what all the fuss is about but I wonder…how many people ask “Are they all dead?” War is a sad and necessary evil sometimes. Let’s not forget that we are here today, living the lives we live, because men and women died for this freedom!

Thanks for reading and hope you enjoy!

Happy Chinese New Year!

Happy Chinese New Year! It’s the Year of the Dragon and to commemorate the year I have created a Dragon Themed Kokeshi Doll!

(Please forgive me if I got the Script wrong…I drew it to the best of my ability! The script says “Dragon”).

For everyone not aware, the Year of the Dragon is very important within the Chinese culture. The Dragon is one of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac. It is the only animal that is mythical as well.

For some great information about The Year of the Dragon, you should check out this website: http://www.usbridalguide.com/special/chinesehoroscopes/Dragon.htm!

If you celebrate, have a wonderful New Year celebration! =D